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Carlene Knight would love to do things that most people take for granted, such as read books, drive a car, ride a bike, gaze at animals in a zoo and watch movies. She also longs to see expressions on people's faces.

"To be able to see my granddaughter especially — my granddaughter's face," said Knight, 54, who lives outside Portland, Ore. "It would be huge."

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Scientists are taking a second look at the role that wetlands play in climate change. Coastal wetlands absorb a lot of carbon, which is good, but new research in Delaware finds they also release a lot of carbon. They might release even more with a warming climate. Sophia Schmidt of Delaware Public Media has this encore presentation.

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There's a sort of time warp going on at The Villages, the enormous retirement community in Florida.

On streets made up to look like small-town Main Streets, it's maybe an idealized, slickly varnished version of the 1950s — albeit with legions of golf carts.

At a hotel ballroom on Friday night, it was something like 2017.

"I just got to check something; I just want to make sure I'm in the right place. Tell me, who is your president?" Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene yelled to a packed ballroom of mostly maskless supporters.

"Donald Trump!" they yelled in response.

After Peter Tuchman left the New York Stock Exchange in March 2020, he was worried he wouldn't come back.

"I basically came very close to dying," he says.

Known as "the most photographed man on Wall Street," Tuchman has an amazing expressiveness that tells you instantly if stocks are up or down. He contracted COVID-19 early on and has had health issues ever since. Tuchman didn't return to the trading floor full time until November.

The opioid crisis in the U.S. has never gone away.

Almost every year, more people die of opioid overdoses than in the year before. More than a half-million people have died from prescription painkillers, heroin and illicit fentanyl since 1999. Provisional data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than 66,000 people died of an opioid overdose in the U.S. in the 12 months to September 2020, a huge jump from the previous 12 months.

The shutdown of one of the largest refined products pipelines in the United States following a ransomware attack has prompted speculation about what could happen to gas and diesel prices if the shutdown continues.

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