Jonathan Franklin

Jonathan Franklin is a digital reporter on the News desk covering general assignment and breaking national news.

For the last few years, Franklin has been reporting and covering a broad spectrum of local and national news in the nation's capital. Prior to NPR, he served as a digital multiskilled journalist for the TEGNA-owned CBS affiliate in Washington, D.C., WUSA. While at WUSA, Franklin covered and reported on some of the major stories over the last two years – the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the Black/African American community, D.C.'s racial protests and demonstrations following the death of George Floyd, the 2020 presidential election and the January 6 insurrection on the U.S. Capitol.

A scan of Franklin's byline will find hundreds of local breaking news stories, engaging ledes and well-calibrated anecdotes that center the individuals and communities in service of the journalism he's pursuing.

Prior to WUSA, Jonathan produced and reported for various ABC and CW affiliates across the country and was a freelance multimedia journalist for The Washington Informer in Washington, D.C. He began his journalism career at WDCW in Washington.

A native of Columbia, South Carolina, Franklin earned his master's degree in journalism with an emphasis in broadcast and digital journalism from Georgetown University and his undergraduate degrees in English, Humanities and African/African American Studies from Wofford College.

Franklin is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., both the National and Washington Associations of Black Journalists, Online News Association, and the Society of Professional Journalists.

In his spare time, Franklin enjoys traveling to new cities and countries, watching movies, reading a good novel, and all alongside his favorite pastime: brunch.

Betty Soskin has accomplished a lot over the course of her life.

She's been a published author, a songwriter-activist during the civil rights movement and a businesswoman and now serves with the National Park Service — holding the title as the country's oldest ranger.

Now Soskin can add another milestone to her story: turning 100.

Thousands of LGBTQ veterans who were discharged from the military under the "don't ask, don't tell" policy have gained new access to full government benefits from the Department of Veterans Affairs.

The Taliban-appointed mayor of Kabul is telling most of the city government's female employees to stay home.

In a new ruling passed down by the Taliban, Kabul interim mayor Hamdullah Namony said that women working for the city's government are to stay home pending a further decision, according to The Associated Press.

In the fight to slow the spread of COVID-19 and to vaccinate its population, Italy is making COVID-19 health passes mandatory for all workers — becoming the first European country to do so.

In a newly approved measure introduced Thursday by the Italian government, officials said digital vaccine certificates will be mandatory for all employees across the country.

Updated September 17, 2021 at 11:18 AM ET

For more than two weeks starting this week, more than 600,000 white flags will fill the National Mall — symbolizing the lives lost to COVID-19 in the United States.

Each of the flags, displayed across the 20 acres of grass, will hold a written personalized message from loved ones honoring their memory.

Once again, country music star Reba McEntire is a survivor.

She was rescued from a historical building in Atoka, Okla., when a staircase collapsed.

The 66-year-old singer was removed from the building through a second-story window by a fire ladder, local TV station KXII reported.

Following the murder of George Floyd last year, the Paramount Network abruptly canceled the law enforcement reality TV series Cops. Now the show has found a new home.

As the United States marks the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks that have forever changed life in America, the leaders of U.S. allies are also honoring the lives lost during the attacks, offering sympathies and remembering the legacies left behind.

Humans are not the only ones adapting to the effects of global climate change.

Animals are also adapting to the environmental changes — as some warm-blooded animals are beginning to "shapeshift" their bodies in response to shifts in climate, according to a recent study in Trends in Ecology & Evolution led by Sara Ryding, a researcher at Deakin University in Australia.

Because of the pandemic, last year's Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City was a virtual event — made just for TV — that was held in the one-block stretch in front of the company's flagship store on 34th Street. But this year, the public will be able to watch the parade flow through Manhattan in person, Macy's says.

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