Zuzanna Sitek

Reporter, Ozarks at Large
Courtesy / Ozark Chinquapin Foundation

On Thursday's show we introduced you to the once-abundant Ozark chinquapin and the chestnut blight that wiped out a large chunk of the tree population from the region in the 1950s. In part two, we go back to Hobbs State Park where volunteers are working with the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation to cross-pollinate blight-resistant trees in hopes of bringing the species back from the brink.

On today's show, we head to Hobbs State Park where staff and volunteers are working with the Ozark Chinquapin Foundation to bring back a tree that had been abundant in the region until a devastating blight in the 1950s. Plus, more on why Ozark Regional Transit is facing a bus driver shortage. And, we hear from the Escape Tones about their new beat tape.

Z. Sitek / KUAF

The Ozark chinquapin had once been abundant on the rocky ridges of the Ozark and Ouachita Mountains in Arkansas, Missouri, Oklahoma and eastern Texas, but a chestnut blight, which arrived in the region in 1957, wiped out large chunks of the population. For several years, Hobbs State Park has been working with the Missouri-based Ozark Chinquapin Foundation to bring the tree back.

Z. Sitek / KUAF

Ozark Regional Transit is facing a bus driver shortage. The transit authority's executive director says that's because they can't offer competitive wages like other occupations in the region that require a Class B commercial driver's license.

On today's show, more on how the Fayetteville School District is joining the city's effort to reduce the environmental impact of food service. Plus, a first in Arkansas, the Springdale City Council adopts a resolution that declares the city as pro-life. And, we explain why land trusts are worried about syndicated conservation easements that are being sold as tax shelters.

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