287(g)

Courtesy / Washington County

This week, Washington County Sheriff Tim Helder announced he plans to end the sheriff's office's participation in the federal 287(g) program, which creates partnerships between U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and local law enforcement agencies. Helder says he believes the program has been effective in the area, but because of the coronavirus outbreak his employees' time and energy need to be directed elsewhere.

Courtesy / Washington County

The Washington County Sheriff's Office is one of three law enforcement agencies in Arkansas that participate in the 287(g) program, which creates voluntary partnerships between U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and state and local law enforcement agencies to identify and remove undocumented immigrants. We speak with Sheriff Tim Helder about why his office takes part in 287(g), the recent detention of a Fayetteville artist, and the ensuing protests against the program. 

Courtesy / Facebook

Immigration policies, like 287(g), can affect many people and their families. We speak with one parent who is waiting to see whether her son will be deported to Mexico or allowed to come back to Fayetteville.

J. Froelich / KUAF

Several hundred Washington County residents turned out for the annual Immigration and Customs Enforcement 287(g) public meeting late last week in Fayetteville where a majority demanded the program be terminated.

J. Froelich / KUAF

More than 200 residents packed into the Washington County Quorum Courtroom Thursday, many to protest the annual Immigration and Customs Enforcement 287(g) meeting. Full coverage of the meeting will air on the Monday edition of Ozarks at Large.