Animals

University of Arkansas

What are our cats, dogs and octopia really thinking? A University of Arkansas Honors College Signature Seminar next fall will consider animal minds. This Wednesday at 5:15 pm in gearhart Hall Auditorium on the U of A campus, Ed Minar will present a preview lecture about the topic.

Z. SITEK / KUAF

Today, we pick up part two of our story about the HOPE Humane Society animal shelter in Fort Smith and how the overcrowding there ties into a proposed pet licensing ordinance. We learn more about how the new rules would work and why advocates believe they would benefit the whole community.

Z. Sitek / KUAF

The HOPE Humane Society is the only animal shelter in Fort Smith. The no-kill shelter, which has a contract with the city, is at capacity with hundreds of dogs living in pop-up crates wherever they can be safely kept while animal control brings in more stray animals every day. Part one of this two-part story examines the overcrowding at the shelter as the Animal Services Advisory Board gets ready to present its pet licensing ordinance to the Fort Smith Board of Directors.

J. FROELICH / KUAF

We spend some time learning about how dogs learn at the Northwest Arkansas School for Dogs, in Fayetteville, which teaches canine companions best behaviors using positive reinforcement in a playful school setting.

In 1944, a group of concerned Fayetteville residents started The Humane Society of the Ozarks. 73 years later the organization, which relies wholly on donations and private grant-funding, is still concerned about the welfare of animals throughout Northwest Arkansas. 

The Programs Director, Sally Baker Williams, spoke with Pete Hartman about the Humane Society's efforts in honor of their upcoming "Tails of Love" preview party. "Tails of Love" is the group's annual photo book, and this eighth edition features pets among striking Ozarks scenery.