LGBTQ

J. Froelich / KUAF

Cathy Campbell, a Fayetteville-based Licensed Professional Counselor practices LGBTQ affirmative therapy. She says today's anti-LGBTQ political climate can be psychologically debilitating for individuals struggling to come to terms with their identities. Patrick Yang, a counselor with Ozark Guidance, who identifies as queer, says LGBTQ people scarred by prejudice may have trouble finding competent professional help.

J. Froelich / KUAF

Five months after the U.S. Supreme Court reversed an Arkansas Supreme Court ruling against issuing birth certificates to babies born to same-sex married women without court filings, the issue remains embattled. Noted Arkansas LGBTQ Civil Rights Attorney, Cheryl Maples, who appealed Arkansas's birth certificate law before the U.S. Supreme Court, says the legislature must amend all Arkansas birth certificate statutes to be in constitutional compliance. State Rep.

J. Froelich / KUAF

  In her newly released article, "Challenging and Preventing Policies That Prohibit Local Civil Rights Protections for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer People," just published in the American Journal of Public Health, Jennifer Pomeranz, JD, MPH, with the Department of Public Health Policy and Management, College of Global Public Health at New York University, says lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer individuals are at risk for disparate health outcomes when they reside in

Following a pilot program, a new mentoring program for LGBTQ-Plus students is underway at the University of Arkansas. Applications for the program are being accepted on an ongoing basis. More information is available by emailing michelec@uark.edu.

courtesy: Danielle Weatherby

Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge is co-leading a 14-state coalition in filing an Amicus Brief with the U.S. Supreme Court to grant review and protect the freedom of speech and religious refusal rights of a Washington state florist, who refused to provide flowers for a same-sex wedding. The florist was sued by the state of Washington under its discrimination law and an unfair business practices act. Rutledge says the florist’s freedom of speech is protected under the U.S. Constitution.

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