Pryor Center

Courtesy / McGehee Chamber of Commerce

During World War II thousands of American citizens of Japanese descent were forced to leave their homes and businesses to live behind barded wire in Arkansas. This week's collection of archives from the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History includes memories from George Takei who was forced to relocate with is family.

Courtesy / Pryor Center

This week's collection of archives from the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History all come from August, 1975. President Ford visited Fort Smith, Congressman Wilbur Mills was in rehab and an Arkansas city becomes the Minnow Capital.

Courtesy / Pryor Center

For this week's dip into archives from the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History, we explore concerts in Arkansas from the 1960s and '70s. War Memorial Stadium and Barton Coliseum attracted some of the top acts in the country.

On today’s show, a new law is prompting the creation of the state’s first breast milk bank. Plus the expanding costs of a closed I-40 bridge, the conclusion of the decades-long saga of James Dean Walker, and much more.

 

Courtesy / University of North Dakota

 Randy Dixon, with the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History, uses archives to conclude the story of James Dean Walker. Walker was twice convicted of murder, then escaped from Arkansas. The story ends with a possible third trial and a plea agreement.

Courtesy / UNIVERSITY NORTH DAKOTA

For this week's edition of our Pryor Center Profiles, we pick up the story of James Dean Walker, twice convicted of murder.  This week our archives continue the story after he escaped custody and fled west.

Courtesy / Encyclopedia of Arkansas

This week’s trip into Arkansas history, courtesy of Randy Dixon with the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History, features the life, passions and career of legendary cartoonist George Fisher.

Courtesy / Pryor Center

This week's trip into history, courtesy of archives from the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History, takes us back to September, 1971. The 26th Amendment gave younger voters a voice, questions developed about the Supreme Court roster and Arkansas was deep into razorback mania.

Courtesy / University North Dakota

Our weekly trip back in time with the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History takes us through an examination of an Arkansas homicide from 1963. Questions still surround the case and the trials that followed.

Courtesy / University of North Dakota

Randy Dixon, with the David and Barbara Pryor Center for Arkansas Oral and Visual History, helps us remember a case with two murder convicitions, an escape and recapture, and an eventual release that spanned nearly 20 years.

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