University of Arkansas Music Department

Fayetteville gets extra jazzy this weekend, thanks to the Fayetteville Jazz Festival. Learn more from organizers Kim and Chris Teal of the University of Arkansas Community Music School.

"Jazz has been such an interesting way to approach scholarship because it's given me a really interesting lens on the history of the United States and American culture," explains Kim.

A monthlong celebration of women in music from the University of Arkansas comes to a close Saturday, Mar. 30, with "Student Collage" featuring students in the music department performing women composers.

Learn more in this conversation with students Elizabeth Greener, Manchusa Loungsangroong and Fiona Slaughter.

More than 400 saxophone players convene on the University of Arkansas campus this week for the North American Saxophone Alliance's region 4 conference.

Ahead of this tremendous gathering of saxophones, the Obstreperous Saxophone Sextet stopped by the Firmin-Garner Performance Studio to perform and chat all things saxophone.

Landon Cole, Grant Hollis, Michael Succox, Benjamin Turner, Bailey Ross and Ryan Miller make up ththis undergraduate ensemble. They'll perform at this week's conference.

Katy Henriksen

  

With an aim to put women front and center, the University of Arkansas Music Department launched "She: A Festival of Women in Music," with concerts and lectures throughout the month of March.

The series continues Thursday, Mar. 14, with "Her Voice," a recital led by oboe professor Theresa Delaplain. Learn more about the many events planned and hear an in-studio performance from Delaplain along with Ronda Mains, flute, and Hyun Kim, piano. 

Chris Knighten

While on sabbatical last year, University of Arkansas music professor Chal Ragsdale arranged a new edition of "Lads of Wamphray Ballad" - a long-neglected ballad from the eccentric Australian composer Percy Grainger.

Ragsdale, a leading scholar on Grainger, says his instrumentation and compositions were integral to the development of modern American band music. 

"[He] put forward a vision of what a band could be," Ragsdale says. "What his vision was is what the wind band became particularly after World War I and World War II on into Today." 

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