On today's show, we get an update on the unemployment rates in Arkansas's largest cities as the pandemic stretches on. Plus, we head to a century-old girls' summer camp on the banks of the Illinois River that's undergoing restoration. And, we find out about some of the summer fireworks shows in the area that are going ahead while adapting to current public health directives.

Michael Tilley, with Talk Business and Politics, discusses recent unemployment numbers in Arkansas's largest cities as the pandemic continues.

J. Froelich / KUAF

Gypsy Camp, constructed on the banks of the Illinois River south of Siloam Springs in rural Benton County almost a century ago, is being preserved. The quaint girls' summer camp operated from 1921 to 1978 before turning into a private residence. Two years ago, a private partnership purchased the property to establish a a river outfitting business and restore the site, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Jerrid Gelinas provides a tour.

Becca Martin-Brown, the features editor for the Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, says there will be a few fireworks this summer. But, like so many other things, the 2020 fireworks shows will be different and subject to public health rules.

We dip into our archives to bring you a pair of singalongs from the 2019 and 2018 installments of the Fayetteville Roots Festival. First, Rhiannon Giddens, Darrell Scott and the Honey Dewdrops bring us "Light in the Valley," followed by a rendition of "This Land is Your Land" with Mary Gauthier, Jamiee Harris, Michele Gazich, Joe Purdy and Branjae.

Scratching the Surface: Quaoar

Jul 3, 2020

On this episode of Scratching the Surface, Pluto Manager Caitlin Ahrens talks about the possible dwarf-planet Quaoar.  

On today's show, we have the latest from the governor's daily coronavirus response briefing. Plus, we hear about a new University of Arkansas study that found women are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. And, Talking Tunes is back as live music makes a slow return in the region.

On the eve of the Fourth of July holiday weekend, Governor Asa Hutchinson announced the state had hit a new one-day high with 878 new COVID-19 cases. Seven counties recorded 20 or more new cases. Washington and Benton Counties both recorded high new case numbers compared to the previous 24-hour testing period. There were 117 new cases in Washington County, 75 in Benton County, 55 in Sebastian County and 23 in Crawford County. Across the state, there are now more than 6,000 active coronavirus infections.

Courtesy / Gema Zamarro

A research brief newly published by University of Arkansas Professor Gema Zamarro, who teaches in the Department of Education Reform, reveals women are disproportionately affected by the coronavirus pandemic. Zamarro co-authored the research brief on "Gender Differences in the Impact of COVID-19" with University of Southern California colleagues Francisco Perez-Arce and Maria Prados.

 

The newly reconstituted Fayetteville City Board of Health held its first meeting online Wednesday, establishing rules and procedures, choosing a chair, and setting an agenda explicitly to find ways to control the COVID-19 epidemic occurring within city limits.

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A third former Minneapolis police officer involved in the killing of George Floyd has been released from jail.

According to Hennepin County jail records, Tou Thao was released from custody with conditions on Saturday morning after posting $750,000 bond.

Protesters in Baltimore pulled down a statue of Christopher Columbus and hurled it into the city's Inner Harbor on Saturday night, adding to the list of monuments toppled during nationwide demonstrations against racism and police brutality.

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SCOTT DETROW, HOST:

The coronavirus pandemic may have forced major sports leagues to rethink their seasons, but there's one annual competition that went off without a hitch.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: Go.

Ashima Shiraishi, 19, is one of the most talented rock climbers in the world. And she'd like to let you in on a rather unglamorous secret: "Most of climbing, it's you just falling," she says. "Every time you go back at it, you improve slightly."

Shiraishi is the author of a new book called How to Solve a Problem: The Rise (and Falls) of a Rock-Climbing Champion — she says it's about how she approaches all kinds of obstacles.

Julian Bass loves Spider-Man, a trait you can easily glean by scrolling through the videos he posts to his TikTok and Twitter accounts.

"I just think Spider-Man is so fun. It's so inspiring to me," Bass told NPR's Weekend Edition. "Everything, every little aspect that you could possibly think of about Spider-Man is something that I'm aware of, that I know of."

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