We learn about today's Mind Coalition Mindfest taking place in Springale as well as the Two Step to Tradition benefit tonight in Fort Smith.

On today's show, we hear from a former Buffalo National River archeologist about the looting of prehistoric and historic sites in the Ozarks. Plus, the University of Arkansas breaks ground on a new $45-million Student Success Center. And, we hear musicians' thoughts on country music, dignity, and genre stereotypes ahead of the premiere of Ken Burns' County Music documentary this weekend.

Courtesy / National Park Service

Former Buffalo National River archeologist, Caven Clark, says looting of prehistoric and historic sites in the Ozarks is a big problem. He will be presenting a program on the subject at the Hobbs State Park Conservation Area Visitor Center Sunday, Sept. 15, at 2 p.m.

A. Grajeda / KUAF

Once the project is complete, the University of Arkansas Student Success Center will be a four-story, 71,000-square-foot building in the heart of campus that will bring together student success programs in one location. The center is expected to open in early 2022.  

Courtesy / Virginia Luque

Virginia Luque will perform Saturday night at 7 p.m. following a wine and cheese reception at 5:30 p.m. at Butterfield Trail Village Retirement Community in Fayetteville. Tickets for non-residents may be obtained by calling (479) 695-8007.

Becca Martin-Brown, the features editor at the Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, says she has an entertainment schedule that we should follow. She promises we'll be pleased.

Courtesy / PBS

The new Ken Burns documentary, Country Music, will begin airing Sunday evening on PBS stations around the country, including AETN. Last month, during this year's edition of the Fayetteville Roots Festival, two preview screenings of the series were held at Fayetteville Public Library. Following one of those screenings, we hosted a panel discussion featuring Darrell Scott, Rhiannon Giddens, and Kagey Parrish and Laura Wortman of the Honey Dewdrops. Here's a portion of that discussion.

Rebecca Black of AIGA of Northwest Arkansas talks about next week's visit and talk by former White House Creative Direcotr Asheligh Axios.

On today's show, a Bentonville church is hosting a workshop with the goal of creating an understanding of how people can become conscious allies to members of the Black community. Plus, more on what attendees can expect at a climate strike later this month. And, we have information about an upcoming summit that will focus on the rural workforce.

All Saints Episcopal Church in Bentonville is hosting a workshop Sept. 14 called “Facing Race: Becoming Conscious Allies.” Church officials are bringing in a facilitator to lead the seminar, whose goal is to create an understanding of how to become conscious allies to members of the Black community. 

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World and Area News

Updated at 10:52 p.m.

Ric Ocasek, the lead singer of the rock band The Cars, died Sunday in New York; he was found unconscious Sunday afternoon at his townhouse in Manhattan. A New York Police Department spokesman confirmed Ocasek's death to NPR. There is some confusion about Ocasek's age: The NYPD said that he was 75; public records list his age as 70 years old.

Book: 'What Is A Girl Worth?'

6 hours ago

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

By now, you've probably heard about Larry Nassar, the former doctor for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University. He was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison for sexually abusing dozens of girls and young women, all under the guise of providing medical treatment. The first person to publicly accuse Nassar of sexual abuse was former gymnast Rachael Denhollander. She writes about her experience in a new memoir called "What Is A Girl Worth" and a children's book called "How Much Is A Little Girl Worth?"

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

By now, you've probably heard about Larry Nassar, the former doctor for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University. He was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison for sexually abusing dozens of girls and young women, all under the guise of providing medical treatment. The first person to publicly accuse Nassar of sexual abuse was former gymnast Rachael Denhollander. She writes about her experience in a new memoir called "What Is A Girl Worth" and a children's book called "How Much Is A Little Girl Worth?"

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

By now, you've probably heard about Larry Nassar, the former doctor for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University. He was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison for sexually abusing dozens of girls and young women, all under the guise of providing medical treatment. The first person to publicly accuse Nassar of sexual abuse was former gymnast Rachael Denhollander. She writes about her experience in a new memoir called "What Is A Girl Worth" and a children's book called "How Much Is A Little Girl Worth?"

Updated at 7:51 p.m. ET

Iran says it is not behind Saturday's drone attacks on oil plants in Saudi Arabia, denying accusations from Secretary of State Mike Pompeo that Tehran was responsible for "an unprecedented attack on the world's energy supply."

Javad Zarif, Iran's foreign minister, said in a tweet on Sunday that Pompeo was turning from "max pressure" to "max deceit."

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