On today’s show, we get an update on the plan to extinguish an underground fire burning below Bella Vista for months. Plus, the historic residence of noted Fayetteville architect Fay Jones is being brought to light for the first time through a set of inaugural guided public tours. And J.D. Clayton plays for us inside the Firmin-Garner Performance Studio.

Bella Vista community members and other stakeholders got a progress report Thursday on extinguishing the underground stump dump fire. State environmental officials say once phase one of extinguishing the fire is complete in the coming days, work will move to excavating the site, extinguishing the fire and remediating the area.

The historic residence of noted Arkansas architect E. Fay Jones is being brought to light through limited public tours and an interactive kiosk. The project is a collaboration between the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design and the Tesseract Center for Immersive Environments and Game Design at the University of Arkansas.

Becca Martin Brown, features editor at the Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette, gives us a list of things to do this weekend that you might not have considered, such as the 27th Annual Spring Crank-Up in Gentry, the return of Springfest, Ozark Stories at Shiloh Museum, and more. 

Today, we hear from organizers of the Arkansas Citizens' Climate Accord, which will take place April 27 in Fayetteville, Fort Smith, Jonesboro and Little Rock. Organizers say they want Arkansans from different backgrounds with different ideas and questions to participate.

J.D. Clayton is a newer face in the regional music scene, but his chops as a singer and songwriter have already begun to draw an audience. He'll perform April 20 at Neumeier's Rib Room in Fort Smith, and he'll also perform April 27 at the Clayton House Museum.

On today's show, we hear about an upcoming gathering that will take place simultaneously in four Arkansas cities to raise money and awareness about climate change. Also, a visiting virtuoso who will bring his oud to audiences in northwest Arkansas gives us a preview of his concerts, happening tonight and tomorrow in Fayetteville. And we hear from some of the local musicians who entered this year's Tiny Desk Contest.

People will gather simultaneously in Fort Smith, Fayetteville, Jonesboro and Little Rock on April 27 for the Arkansas Citizens’ Climate League Arkansas Climate Accord. Shelly Buonaiuto is helping organize the Fayetteville version of the event this year, and she says the sessions serve as both informational exchanges and fundraisers. Money raised this year helps members of the Arkansas Citizens Climate League go to Washington, D.C. to meet with members of the state’s congressional delegation.

There aren't many musicians who can say they have performed with R.E.M., Bill Frisell, Arturo O'Farrill and Public Enemy, but Rahim AlHaj can claim that honor. The virtuoso oud player has studied the instrument since he was 9 years old, and he has wowed audiences around the world with his skills on the ancient instrument. He will perform at 6 p.m. Thursday night at Fayetteville Public Library, and the Rahim AlHaj Trio will perform at 7:30 p.m. Friday at Faulkner Performing Arts Center.

Artists in the six-state region engaged in social and civic change are invited to apply for $20,000 project grants under a Mid-America Arts Alliance pilot program called Interchange.

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World and Area News

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Tomorrow marks 20 years since two gunmen at Columbine High School in Colorado killed 13 people. The incident is still relevant today. This week, the FBI says a woman infatuated with Columbine made credible threats, traveled to the area and bought a gun. From member station KUNC, Leigh Paterson reports that, for the last two decades, schools have taken steps to better protect and care for their students.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Tomorrow marks 20 years since two gunmen at Columbine High School in Colorado killed 13 people. The incident is still relevant today. This week, the FBI says a woman infatuated with Columbine made credible threats, traveled to the area and bought a gun. From member station KUNC, Leigh Paterson reports that, for the last two decades, schools have taken steps to better protect and care for their students.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Tomorrow marks 20 years since two gunmen at Columbine High School in Colorado killed 13 people. The incident is still relevant today. This week, the FBI says a woman infatuated with Columbine made credible threats, traveled to the area and bought a gun. From member station KUNC, Leigh Paterson reports that, for the last two decades, schools have taken steps to better protect and care for their students.

You can read the redacted Mueller report right now, free, on the Department of Justice website. Or you can read it here on NPR.org.

After more than three decades, University of North Carolina women's basketball coach Sylvia Hatchell has resigned from leading the celebrated program. Her resignation followed an external review that found she made "racially insensitive" remarks, exercised "undue influence" on athletes to play while injured and lacked a connection with her players.

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