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Author Interviews

Author Interviews

Conversations and interviews with local and national authors on Ozarks at Large is a highlight of arts and culture coverage for KUAF Public Radio.
  • Keri Blakinger's path to journalism contains several twists. In her memoir, “Corrections in Ink," Blakinger writes about the day in Ithaca when she was arrested. Throughout the rest of the book, she gives details about her incarceration in jail, then prison, and her life before and after incarceration. Blakinger will talk about the memoir at the Fayetteville Public Library on April 22. She spoke with Ozarks at Large's Kyle Kellams about the book and event.
  • Sarah McCammon is a reporter for NPR. Her new book, “Exvangelicals: On Living, Loving and Leaving the White Evangelical Church,” documents her upbringing in an evangelical household and follows her egress from such a life, as well as those of others who grew up the same way and departed as well. McCammon spoke with Ozarks at Large's Kyle Kellams about the book and her transition out of an all-encompassing religious life.
  • The upcoming book “Native Nations” delivers a history of the people of North America beginning with the 11th century. Kathleen DuVal, a professor of history at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, takes on myths of Native populations head on and offers details of great cities of the last millennium like Cahokia.
  • Gregg Behr is the founder of Remake Learning Network based in Pittsburgh and co-author of the book “When you Wonder, You’re Learning: Mister Rogers’ Enduring Lessons for Raising Creative, Curios, Caring Kids.” Ozarks at Large's Kyle Kellams met with Behr at the Scott Family Amazeum to ask him about his work, his book and Mr. Rogers.
  • Senator Mitt Romney sees himself as a man who solves crises. Author McKay Coppins joins Ozarks at Large's Matthew Moore to discuss his biography of the senator and
  • Brandon Weston, a native Ozarker, explores and writes about Ozark folkways. Weston has written several books and articles, including “Ozark Folk Magic: Plants, Prayer & Healing” and the just-released “Granny Thornapple’s Book of Charms: Magic and Folklore From the Ozark Mountains." He visited the Carver Center for Public Radio to discuss his writings and inspiration.
  • The new book “Ella the Banker” is a family project. The children’s book is a collaboration between ten-year-old Liam Sprinkle and his mom, Shamim Okolloh. Liam’s eight-year-old sister, Ella, is the inspiration for the book. Last week, Shamim, Liam and Ella joined Ozarks at Large's Kyle Kellams on Zoom from their Little Rock home.
  • One of the most sophisticated and successful collections of con men operated out of towns in Jasper County, Missouri. Kimberly Harper writes about them in her new book, “Men of No Reputation: Robert Boatright, the Buckfoot Gang and the Fleecing of Middle America,” published by the University of Arkansas Press. Ozarks at Large's Kyle Kellams talked with Harper about the book and about the Buckfoot Gang, an organization known as a con mob.
  • Kiley Reid’s second novel, "Come and Get It,” is available this week and again examines how money, status, and background can influence relationships. Reid nails the sometimes clunky and awkward moments of life. ”Come and Get It” is set on the University of Arkansas campus in Fayetteville.
  • The voice of Ayesha Rascoe is one familiar to KUAF listeners. You’ve heard her as a politics reporter, a White House correspondent, and now as the host of Weekend Edition Sunday. But in the new book "HBCU Made", Rascoe says she was lonely, introverted, and deeply treasured her alone time. But when you hear her on the radio now, it’s almost hard to believe that was true.
  • Victor Luckerson’s “Built From the Fire: The Epic Story of Tulsa’s Greenwood District, America’s Black Wall Street” explores how the district became known as Black Wall Street, how it was engulfed in violence in a race massacre in 1921, and what took place in the century since the massacre. Luckerson spoke with Kyle Kellams about how he focused on correctly detailing the history and modern picture of Greenwood.
  • Nell Greenfieldboyce covers science for NPR, specifically how society and scientific development interact. Her new book, “Transient and Strange: Notes on the Science of Life” does the same. Ozarks at Large's Kyle Kellams spoke with her about how being a science reporter can stoke the flames of curiosity.