Daniel Breen

Daniel Breen is a third-year undergraduate journalism student at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

His interest in writing began at a young age, and later served as a reporter and editor for Little Rock Central High School’s Tiger Newspaper. He has served as a production intern for both radio and TV stations, and has had much experience in the editing and creation of media.

Research interests include multimedia, investigative, and citizen journalism as well as current events, politics, and justice. Daniel hopes to work in the field of public broadcasting upon graduation.

In his spare time, Daniel enjoys playing guitar, reading, drinking copious amounts of coffee, and exploring the wilderness of Arkansas.

The death toll from COVID-19 in Arkansas rose to eight Tuesday, with the total number of coronavirus cases at 523.

This comes as state health officials and Gov. Asa Hutchinson say the state’s efforts at "flattening the curve" through social distancing appear to be working.

Arkansas is part of Super Tuesday, the largest single-day primary nationwide, when voters in 14 states and American Samoa will choose which of the remaining Democratic presidential candidates to award more than one-third of all total Democratic delegates to.


Courtesy / Arkansas Secretary of State

An election for a vacant Arkansas House seat in central Arkansas ended in a tie. Daniel Breen from KUAR in Little Rock explains what happens next.

Courtesy / NATIONAL PARK SERVICE/ MICHAEL HIBBLEN / KUAR NEWS

This week, Elizabeth Eckford, one of the nine black teenagers who desegregated Little Rock's Central High School, spoke at the Statehouse Convention Center as part of the Clinton School of Public Service speaker series. Eckford discussed the white mobs, armed soldiers and daily torment that came with being part of that seminal moment.

State regulators have voted not to increase restrictions surrounding the use of a controversial herbicide that has been blamed for widespread damage to crops and other plants.

Members of the Arkansas State Plant Board met Wednesday to discuss new proposed regulations on dicamba for the 2020 growing season. All but one member voted to not require farmers who use the chemical on genetically modified cotton and soybean fields to report spraying records and real-time GPS coordinates to an online database.

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