Daniel Breen

Daniel Breen is a third-year undergraduate journalism student at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

His interest in writing began at a young age, and later served as a reporter and editor for Little Rock Central High School’s Tiger Newspaper. He has served as a production intern for both radio and TV stations, and has had much experience in the editing and creation of media.

Research interests include multimedia, investigative, and citizen journalism as well as current events, politics, and justice. Daniel hopes to work in the field of public broadcasting upon graduation.

In his spare time, Daniel enjoys playing guitar, reading, drinking copious amounts of coffee, and exploring the wilderness of Arkansas.

On today's show, we speak with Arkansas Secretary of Commerce Mike Preston about the state of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program after the passage of a third federal stimulus bill. Plus, we learn about a number of bills making their way through the Arkansas legislature, including a proposal that would allow college-level athletes to make money off of their name, voice, signature, photograph or likeness. And, we head to southwest Benton County where the Northwest Arkansas Land Trust is preserving three parcels of land in historic Springtown.

Before heading to a brief recess for the rest of the week, the Arkansas House tried to override the governor’s veto of Senate Bill 301. The bill would return fines to businesses that violated COVID-19 public health guidelines. The Senate voted in favor of a veto Monday, but the House did not garner enough votes Tuesday.

On today's show, we learn about a University of Arkansas tour organized by students that explores the Black experience on campus. Plus, we have analysis of Arkansas Sen. Jim Hendren's decision to leave the Republican Party to become an Independent. And, we head to Pea Ridge where several thousand households and businesses lost their natural gas supply in the midst of back-to-back winter storms.

Courtesy / Arkansas Senate

A bill that would ban nearly all abortions in Arkansas is on its way to the House after passing the Arkansas Senate on Monday. Senate Bill 6, sponsored by Sen. Jason Rapert, R-Conway, states abortions would only be allowed to save the life of the mother and makes no exceptions for instances of rape or incest. The bill now heads to the House Public Health, Welfare and Labor Committee.

 

On today's show, we speak with two members of a family that is in isolation after coming down with COVID-19. They say they want their experience to be a reminder that hundreds of people are still becoming infect every day. Plus, we find out about the latest voter guide released by the Public Polic Center at the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture. And, we hear about a new initiative that aims to put 12 pieces of public art in cities across the state.

Yesterday, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case of an Arkansas law that seeks to regulate the way pharmacies receive reimbursements from insurance providers.

The death toll from COVID-19 in Arkansas rose to eight Tuesday, with the total number of coronavirus cases at 523.

This comes as state health officials and Gov. Asa Hutchinson say the state’s efforts at "flattening the curve" through social distancing appear to be working.

Arkansas is part of Super Tuesday, the largest single-day primary nationwide, when voters in 14 states and American Samoa will choose which of the remaining Democratic presidential candidates to award more than one-third of all total Democratic delegates to.


Courtesy / Arkansas Secretary of State

An election for a vacant Arkansas House seat in central Arkansas ended in a tie. Daniel Breen from KUAR in Little Rock explains what happens next.

Courtesy / NATIONAL PARK SERVICE/ MICHAEL HIBBLEN / KUAR NEWS

This week, Elizabeth Eckford, one of the nine black teenagers who desegregated Little Rock's Central High School, spoke at the Statehouse Convention Center as part of the Clinton School of Public Service speaker series. Eckford discussed the white mobs, armed soldiers and daily torment that came with being part of that seminal moment.

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