Raven Cook

Contributing Reporter

Reflections in Black is a weekly segment on Ozarks at Large, hosted by Raven Cook. Reflections in Black is dedicated to exploring the legacy of Black Americans, both in the United States and around the globe, by providing resources for understanding and hope for all people.

You can learn more about Raven and the segments you hear on the Foundations: Black History Education Programming facebook page. 

Ways to Connect

On today's show, we have the latest from Governor Asa Hutchinson's weekly coronavirus response briefing, which he held Tuesday in Little Rock. Plus, we have details on the Northwest Arkansas Council's Life Works Here initiative, which aims to attract STEAM talent to the state with a $10,000 incentive. And, we learn about the best ways to dispose of all those leaves in your yard so they don't impair drainage systems and water quality.

Diahann Carroll was born Carol Diann Johnson in the Bronx in 1935. At a young age, she won a music scholarship and began modeling as a teen. While studying at New York University, she won a TV talent show and sang at the famed Latin Quarter nightclub in 1954. She soon started acting in Hollywood and Broadway productions, and received a Tony award for Best Actress in a Musical for her work in No Strings. She would later perform on Hollywood variety shows such as The Tonight Show and others.

On today's show, we have highlights from Governor Asa Hutchinson's weekly coronavirus response briefing, which included new guidelines for houses of worship. Plus, we have information on how to apply for a new rental assistance program funded by federal money allocated to the state. And, we speak with members of The Crumbs about their newest album in three years.

Born in 1898, Septima P. Clark was a civil rights activist and educator. She worked with the NAACP and other civil rights organizations, and she was a teacher for more than 40 years. This is her story. This segment originally aired on March 6, 2019.

On today's show, we look back at last night's election results in Arkansas with Roby Brock of Talk Business and Politics, who says Arkansas was already a red state, but it just got redder. Plus, we have details about the expansion of the Children's Advocacy Center of Benton County with a new facility in Gentry. And, we learn about a major grant that will allow the Northwest Arkansas Land Trust to expand its farmland preservation program.

Courtesy / THE NEW YORK TIMES

James Hal Cone, born in Fordyce, Ark. in 1938, grew up in Bearden and earned a Master's of Divinity from Garrett Theological Seminary as well as a Master's and Ph.D. from Northwestern University. He developed the concept of Black Liberation Theology, which is defined as a theological identity that was accountable to the life, history, and culture of African-American people. He also wrote Black Theology and Black Power in 1969 as well as other critical texts. This is his story. This segment originally aired on April 17, 2019.

Courtesy / Fisk University Library, Special Collections

Born in 1851, Ella Sheppard was enslaved on the Hermitage Plantation in Hermitage, Tenn. After learning that her daughter was being trained to spy on her, Ella's mother went to the river to drown both of them to escape the bonds of slavery. On approaching the river, Ella's mother was stopped by an elderly enslaved woman who insisted that no harm come to the child. Ella was eventually bought by her father and sent to Nashville. They then eventually moved to Cincinnati, where she began her musical training. She worked with distinguished music teachers to learn piano and singing.

On today's show, we have the latest from Governor Asa Hutchinson's weekly coronavirus response briefing. Plus, we hear more about the vandalism of a local campaign sign earlier this month. And, we head into the archives for a story from more than 20 years ago when University of Arkansas architecture students spent a semester designing a space station.

Courtesy / John Mathew Smith

Sonia Sanchez was born in Birmingham, Ala. in 1934. She got her bachelor's degree from Hunter College in 1955 and pursued a graduate degree under the mentorship of poet Louise Bogan. In the 1960s, she worked with the Congress of Racial Equality before hearing Malcolm X and taking a separatist posture instead. She began a career as a professor at Downtown Community School in New York, later moving to San Francisco State College. As a professor, she pioneered in the fields of Black Studies and Women's Studies.

On today's show, we speak with two members of a family that is in isolation after coming down with COVID-19. They say they want their experience to be a reminder that hundreds of people are still becoming infect every day. Plus, we find out about the latest voter guide released by the Public Polic Center at the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture. And, we hear about a new initiative that aims to put 12 pieces of public art in cities across the state.

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