Jacqueline Froelich

KUAF Reporter, "Ozarks at Large" and NPR Correspondent

Jacqueline Froelich is an investigative journalist and has been a news producer for KUAF National Public Radio since 1998. She covers politics, the environment, energy, business, education, history, race and culture. Her radio segments have been nationally syndicated. She is also a station-based national correspondent for NPR in Washington DC., and recipient of eight national and state broadcast awards. 

Ways to Connect

On today’s show, we'll how an art project in downtown Paris considers big ideas. Plus, a new school for media arts called PIXEL has opened in Rogers. And we hear about the challenge of picking a cover for a magazine issue devoted to art and fashion.

A new media arts school called PIXEL based in Rogers offers classes to youth and adults interested in graphic design, animation and video game development. The school, based at The Center for Nonprofits is directed by Hollywood digital animator David Kersey.  The Art School also facilitates NERDIES™ for kids, originated by Brad Harvey. 

On today’s show, we hear about upcoming public talks that will pay attention to the women of the National Park Service. Plus, Michael Tilley from Talk Business and Politics reflects on Tuesday’s rejection of a sales tax plan to help fund the U.S. Marshals Museum, and Royal Wade Kimes can write a song and tell a story. He stops by to tell us some stories from his career in music. 

Buffalo National River Park

In honor of Women’s History Month, Buffalo National River Park Ranger, Lauren Ray, is presenting two talks about women serving in the National Park Service, focusing in part on evolving dress codes. 

On this edition of Ozarks, Fayetteville primary care physician, Dr. John Furlow operates what’s called a direct primary care medical practice. He accepts no insurance, and we have more details on today’s show. Plus, we learn what we can do to reduce the possibility of stroke, and Bonnie Montgomery says her parents’ music store had a big influence on her. We speak with Montgomery ahead of her performance later this month in Fayetteville.

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