Sarah Kellogg / KUAR

Sarah was drawn towards radio reporting her freshman year in college at the University of Missouri in Columbia, where she already knew she wanted to be a journalist. Throughout her junior and senior years, Sarah reported and produced stories for KBIA, the NPR member station in Columbia. She received her bachelor’s of journalism in Radio/Television reporting with an emphasis on radio.

Immediately after graduation, she wanted to get more experience in political reporting so she went back to Mizzou for her master’s in public affairs reporting, where she spent her final semester as the Missouri statehouse reporter for KBIA.

Now in Arkansas, Sarah is putting that master’s degree to use, covering the statehouse for KUAR. When she’s not in the newsroom, she’s normally watching a lot of movies, hanging out with her cats and trying out new recipes.

Email: sarah@kuar.org

Newsroom: 501-683-7400

On today's show, we have information about how to apply for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program at community action agencies across the state as the pandemic continues to impact people's incomes. Plus, we have a recap of what happened during the first day of the Arkansas Regular Legislative Session in Little Rock. And, we tell you about a new podcast that focuses on Northwest Arkansas's Marshallese community.

Courtesy / Arkansas Legislature

On the first day of the Arkansas Legislative Session, Rep. Stephanie Flowers, a Democrat from Pine Bluff, suggested an update to a rule requiring face coverings. She proposed an amendment penalizing anyone who fails to wear one at all times by docking per diem payments. The amendment was rejected on a voice vote.

On today's show, we speak with local bar owners about a lawsuit filed against state officials after the governor extended an 11 p.m. curfew on establishments that have on-premise alcohol permits. Plus, the 93rd General Assembly convenes today in Little Rock, so we take a look at COVID-19 protective measures being taken at the Arkansas Capitol and the bills that have already been filed by lawmakers. And, we hear about this weekend's Saturday Series at the Shiloh Museum of Ozark History, which will focus on an Ozark folk artist.

Courtesy / Sarah Kellogg / KUAR News

The Regular Session of the 93rd General Assembly convenes today. Lawmakers have already filed bills on topics ranging from abortion to hate crimes. Sarah Kellogg, with our content partner KUAR, speaks with AP reporter Andrew Demillo to learn what we can expect from the 2021 session.

As the number of coronavirus cases in the state continues to rise, those involved with political petitions are finding it difficult to gather signatures. We hear from Melissa Fults, the executive director of Arkansans for Cannabis Reform, which is behind the Arkansas Adult Use Cannabis Amendment, about the challenges.

Though no new presumed cases of COVID-19 were announced in Arkansas on Tuesday, Gov. Asa Hutchinson said more diagnoses can be expected as the state's testing capability grows.

Some health insurance companies, such as United Healthcare and Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield have adjusted their policies to cover testing for the coronavirus for its customers. Member Station KUAR's Sarah Kellogg spoke with Curtis Barnett, president and CEO of Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield on the changes the health insurer has made due to COVID-19.

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The most recent report from the Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration shows the state's revenue continues to grow with a 1.1 percent increase compared to last year. 

A multimillion dollar grant, awarded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, will enable the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture and its partnering universities to conduct research on water efficiency in the poultry industry, as well as other topics.

Courtesy / Arkansas Farm Bureau

Rain, heat and almost everything else has had an effect on Arkansas farmers in 2019 and those irregular weather patterns both harmed and helped them in their planting and harvesting.

A news conference and memorial honoring former Arkansas state senator Linda Collins offered no new details on the case and asked those with any relevant information to contact authorities.

Collins formerly served in the Arkansas House of Representatives and the Arkansas Senate, before losing re-election in 2018 to a GOP primary challenger. She was found dead in her home last week. The investigation is still underway.