Pete Hartman

KUAF's Operations Manager

Pete Hartman was born in 1973 and had a wonderful childhood in Greenbrier, Arkansas. He moved to Harrison, Arkansas, in 1989 and attended High School there. He then attended North Arkansas Community College from 1992-1994. Pete moved to Fayetteville during the summer of 1994 and began attending the University of Arkansas that fall...within the Journalism Department. By January 1995, he had found his way to KUAF as a work-study student - answering phones and doing clerical work. After learning how to cut audio breaks he soon began working with Kyle Kellams on Ozarks at Large - way back when it was just one episode per week.

It took Pete almost ten years to get his bachelors degree from the U-of-A...he just had too much fun with the college experience. But by 2004, he had entrenched himself in all that was KUAF and Rick Stockdell had a position for him, IF he would just write his Senior Paper and graduate. Which, he did.

Pete has been working as Operations Manager of KUAF since that time, something that keeps him on his toes with many different duties and responsibilities including voicing KUAF Underwriting announcements. 

Pete Hartman has many hobbies: fishing, fly-tying, dirt biking, metal detecting...but what he enjoys the most is spending time with his wife Christine and his three daughters: Evie, Rosa and Sylvie.

Pete Hartman owns a Subaru.

Ways to Connect

Today Pete speaks with Ken Kupchick with Antioch for Youth & Family about the history and the needs of this River Valley non-profit. 

You can drop off nonperishable food donations under the giving tree at 9 S. School Avenue in Fayetteville. 

In honor of the Thanksgiving season, join us for a limited Community Spotlight series on Oral Food History Projects, produced by students from the University of Arkansas' Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness.

Today Pete talks with student Talon Cook about the kind of foods that his grandfather ate growing up on their family farm in Oklahoma.  Talon's grandfather describes changes in consumption practices and the different types of foods that are available today due to mass production and globalization. 

In honor of the Thanksgiving season, join us for a limited Community Spotlight series on Oral Food History Projects, produced by students from the University of Arkansas' Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness.

Today Pete talks with student Marcela Marqueda about her grandmother's experience growing up in the isolated backwoods of Northwest Arkansas during the 1950s.  Marcela describes what is lost, as well as what is gained, from the evolution of agricultural and consumption practices that we experience today. 

In honor of the Thanksgiving season, join us for a limited Community Spotlight series on Oral Food History Projects, produced by students from the University of Arkansas' Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness.

Today Pete talks with student Conner Lunsford about an interview with his grandmother. Conner describes what poultry farming looked like in the 1950s and 1960s, and how American consumption practices have changed over the decades. 

Stay tuned for more installations of the Oral Food History series. 

In honor of the Thanksgiving season, join us for a limited Community Spotlight series on Oral Food History Projects, produced by students from the University of Arkansas' Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness.

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