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What the end of Time's Up means for the future of the #MeToo movement

An attendee wears a 'Times Up' badge as he arrives for the 75th Golden Globe Awards on Jan. 7, 2018, in Beverly Hills, California. (Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images)
An attendee wears a 'Times Up' badge as he arrives for the 75th Golden Globe Awards on Jan. 7, 2018, in Beverly Hills, California. (Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images)

Time’s Up, the anti-harassment group, is shutting down and giving its remaining funding to the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund.

Time’s Up sprung up in the early days of the #MeToo movement and was aimed at protecting women from harassment. But in 2021, two of its leaders resigned after revelations that they helped cover up allegations of sexual harassment against then-New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Now, the group will now stop operations and give its remaining money to the Time’s Up Legal Defense Fund, which is administered independently by the National Women’s Law Center.

Here & Now‘s Jane Clayson speaks with Emily Martin, vice president of education and workplace justice at the National Women’s Law Center. She was part of the team that created the fund she now helps to run.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

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