Jonathan Franklin

Jonathan Franklin is a digital reporter on the News desk covering general assignment and breaking national news.

For the last few years, Franklin has been reporting and covering a broad spectrum of local and national news in the nation's capital. Prior to NPR, he served as a digital multiskilled journalist for the TEGNA-owned CBS affiliate in Washington, D.C., WUSA. While at WUSA, Franklin covered and reported on some of the major stories over the last two years – the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on the Black/African American community, D.C.'s racial protests and demonstrations following the death of George Floyd, the 2020 presidential election and the January 6 insurrection on the U.S. Capitol.

A scan of Franklin's byline will find hundreds of local breaking news stories, engaging ledes and well-calibrated anecdotes that center the individuals and communities in service of the journalism he's pursuing.

Prior to WUSA, Jonathan produced and reported for various ABC and CW affiliates across the country and was a freelance multimedia journalist for The Washington Informer in Washington, D.C. He began his journalism career at WDCW in Washington.

A native of Columbia, South Carolina, Franklin earned his master's degree in journalism with an emphasis in broadcast and digital journalism from Georgetown University and his undergraduate degrees in English, Humanities and African/African American Studies from Wofford College.

Franklin is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., both the National and Washington Associations of Black Journalists, Online News Association, and the Society of Professional Journalists.

In his spare time, Franklin enjoys traveling to new cities and countries, watching movies, reading a good novel, and all alongside his favorite pastime: brunch.

One of the largest Confederate monuments came down Wednesday in Richmond, Va. Now, the state is announcing new plans for the base that used to hold the massive statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

They're going to remove a 133-year-old copper time capsule inside the pedestal and replace it with one that they say will reflect the current cultural climate in Virginia.

The Federal Aviation Administration says drones will be temporarily banned near the Robert E. Lee monument in Richmond, Va. during its removal this week.

The FAA, citing "Special Security Reasons," says the ban will cover a radius of 2-nautical-miles around the statue, as crews begin the work of removing it starting on Wednesday.

Eight states will begin to roll out a new feature that will allow users to add their driver's license and state IDs to Apple Wallet for iPhone and Apple Watch.

Arizona and Georgia will be the first states to introduce the feature, Apple announced on Wednesday, with Connecticut, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Oklahoma and Utah to follow afterward.

Students across Illinois will be able to take up to five excused mental health days starting in January.

Under a bill signed into law by Gov. J.B. Pritzker last month, students who decide to take a mental health day will not be required to provide their school with a doctor's note and will be able to make up any work that was missed on their day off.

Days after a blowout loss on national television, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine has launched an investigation into the high school football program at Bishop Sycamore High School and the school's legitimacy.

Bishop Sycamore failed to score a single point in the game, which was broadcast on ESPN. As the team's opponent widened its lead, viewers and even the ESPN announcers started expressing concerns about the matchup. Bishop Sycamore eventually lost 58-0.

Nearly 70 years after their unjust executions, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam granted posthumous pardons Tuesday to seven Black men known as the "Martinsville Seven," who were executed for the alleged rape of a white woman in 1951 in Martinsville, Va.

Following four years of planning and research, the world's first 3D printed footbridge recently opened to the public in Europe.

The almost 40-foot bridge, unveiled last month, was built by Dutch company MX3D and will serve as a "living laboratory" in Amsterdam's city center.

Researchers and engineers at Imperial College London were able to 3D-print the bridge — which now serves pedestrians and cyclists crossing Amsterdam's Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal.

History is no game, but the developers of Fortnite are adding an iconic moment featuring Martin Luther King Jr. to the popular video game — and some people worry it sends the wrong message about the civil rights leader.

Before stepping on the dance floor, actress and YouTube personality JoJo Siwa is already making history — as the first Dancing with the Stars contestant to be matched with a same-sex partner.

"I am so excited to be a part of 'Dancing With the Stars,' Season 30, and to be dancing with a girl," Siwa said in a tweet. "I think it's so cool."

Siwa's partner will be introduced on the season premiere airing on Sept. 20.

Some parents may have had trouble getting their kids away from electronics and outside this summer. But for one Virginia family, this wasn't the case.

Josh and Cassie Sutton recently completed a full-length hike of the Appalachian Trail with their son, Harvey.

At just 5 years old, Harvey, who earned the nickname "Little Man" from fellow hikers, is one of the youngest people known to have completed the roughly 2,100-mile trail that stretches across 14 states.

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