COVID-19 Vaccine

Courtesy / U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Both of the COVID-19 vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna are examples of new mRNA vaccines. The technology allowed the vaccines to be created quickly and without the use of a live virus. Although vaccines are a new application for mRNA technology, the technology has been used for decades in other areas like cancer treatment.

D. Caruth / KUAF

Collier Drug Stores, which operates pharmacies throughout Northwest Arkansas, is tasked with distributing the Pfizer vaccine to those eligable in Washington County. The company is now encouraging locals in priority groups to sign up for a waitlist to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. 

Courtesy / Arkansas Department of Health

This week, two groups of people in Phase 1B of the COVID-19 vaccination rollout are eligible to receive the vaccine. They include people over the age of 70, as well as educators and staff at K-12 schools, higher education and daycare facilities. While there's a lot to be excited about, Dr. Jennifer Dillaha, with the Arkansas Department of Health, says the current demand for the vaccine outstrips supply as the state is receiving fewer than 38,000 doses per week.

At Tuesday's weekly coronavirus response briefing, Gov. Asa Hutchinson announced the state was on target to vaccinate the 180,000 eligible healthcare workers and long-term care facility residents and staff in phase 1A of the rollout. Given that progress, he said the state would start making the COVID-19 vaccine available to some people in group 1B sooner than originally planned.

Courtesy / UAFS

More than 300 students attending the University of Arkansas Fort Smith had the option to receive the COVID-19 vaccine Monday. A vaccination clinic was hosted on campus thanks to a partnership between Coleman Pharmacy and the UAFS College of Health Sciences.

Michael Hibblen / KUAR

The process of vaccinating Arkansas healthcare workers against COVID-19 got underway Monday after the state received its first shipment of a vaccine from Pfizer. Within hours, frontline employees at the Arkansas Department of Health were rolling up their sleeves to get a shot. This comes only a few days after Governor Asa Hutchinson's address to the state urging Arkansans to continue to take precautions through the holidays.

Courtesy / Arkansas Department of Health

In a two part interview, Arkansas Secretary of Health Dr. Jose Romero, who is also the chair of the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, discusses the COVID-19 vaccines that are on track to be authorized before the end of this year. In part two, Romero talks about whether the state or private employers will mandate the vaccine, the percentage of Arkansans who would need to get vaccinated to achieve herd immunity, the U.K.'s rollout of the Pfizer vaccine and the role of the ACIP.

Courtesy / Arkansas Department of Health

In a two part interview, Arkansas Secretary of Health Dr. Jose Romero, who is also the chair of the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, discusses the COVID-19 vaccines that are on track to be authorized before the end of this year. In part one, Romero talks about the types of vaccines that will be available and Arkansas's plan for distributing them. For part two, click here.