Ozark Literacy Council

J. Froelich / KUAF

Kanyandekwe Innocent Tuyishimire has lived in the U.S. for less than a year, but is already speaking fluent English and American slang. He has learned the language with the help of Ozark Literacy Council volunteer tutor Michael Pitts, a Ph.D. candidate in American literature at the University of Arkansas.

J. Froelich / KUAF

After winning the U.S. Diversity Visa Lottery, Ghadir Abass Goodarzy chose to immigrate to Fayetteville to embark on a new life and second career. This story is part of our continuing series of profiles on Ozark Literacy Council students. Ozark Literacy Council offers all classes free of charge.

J. Froelich / KUAF

Dr. Fuquan Ding and spouse Dr. Limin Zhang immigrated to Northwest Arkansas several years ago to join their daughter, who's studying at the University of Arkansas. They arrived with few English language skills, but they've been more easily able to settle in through help from Ozark Literacy Council in Fayetteville. The couple shares some of their life story with help from translator Bing Bing Yang. This story is part of our continuing series of Ozark Literacy Council profiles.

J. Froelich / KUAF

Every Wednesday, an Ozark Literacy Council class prepares and tastes international cuisine while learning English language health skills and foodways. A cookbook edited by the class will be posted on the Council's website later this year. The Fayetteville-based nonprofit organization offers beginner, intermediate and advanced English language and life skills classes free of charge. With an influx of immigrants and refugees to northwest Arkansas, enrollment has grown from 60 to 460 in recent years.

courtesy: Ozark Literacy Council

Ozark Literacy Council, thanks to the city of Fayetteville bicycle department and a local bakery, is the proud owner of a used bike rack for students--who cycle to class at Council headquarters near Gregg and Sunbridge, just off the Razorback Greenway Trail--to lock onto. And given the nonprofit Council is accommodating 500 students this year, and one quarter bike to class on any given day, a few more rack donations would be very welcome.

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