This post updated at 4:00 p.m. ET.

Utah and Indiana are the latest states to see their bans on same-sex marriage struck down by a federal court, following rulings in both states Wednesday that found the prohibition unconstitutional.

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Jun 25, 2014

Ahead on Ozarks, how to stay safe and entertained this summer. Also, we learn about a tick-borne illness called bobcat fever that's affecting local cats.

Governor Mike Beebe yesterday officially issued the call for a special session of the state legislature. The Federal Reserve Bank released its quarterly Burgundy Book, which provides some insight into the health of the state's economy. hundreds of volunteers associated with World Changers are descending upon Fort Smith to help with some repairs to homes in the city. And the city of Fayetteville recently released a new Web application to help city residents find city information applicable to where they live in the city.

Dozens of teenagers who survived South Korea's ferry disaster returned to school Wednesday for the first time since the deadly accident in April.

As the 73 second-year students walked from a bus to Danwon High School in the city of Ansan, some "bowed their heads as they cried and ... some stopped to hug the parents of their friends, who caressed their hair and face," The Associated Press reports.

A banner at the entrance to school declared, "We pray the dead will rest in peace."

Antoinette Grajeda

Suspected cases of bobcat fever at The Cat Clinic of NWA has steadily increased since January.

Staying Safe in the Summer

Jun 25, 2014
Patrick Feller, flickr

Dr. Estes from Mercy's Bella Vista clinic discusses how to protect yourself against heat, ticks, and more

A U.S. ban on exporting crude oil that has stood for nearly 40 years could be eased a bit this summer, as the Obama administration is seen clearing a path for American companies to export the first shipments of unrefined oil in decades.

The Wall Street Journal reports:

Becca says the winner of the 66th annual River Valley Invitational has an installation on display at the Fort Smith Regional Art Museum.

Diane Sawyer will leave her job as anchor of ABC News' flagship program, World News, during the last week of August, capping a five-year run at the show and kicking off an anchor shuffle at the network.

Roby Brock from Talk Business & Politics talks to the CEO of St. Vincent Health System about a recent acquisition and merger.

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The drawing is Friday, Dec. 14

World and Area News

North Korea appears to be expanding a missile base in a remote, mountainous part of the country, according to new commercial satellite imagery studied by independent researchers.

The base, located near the Chinese border, is believed to be capable of housing long-range missiles that could, in theory, hit the United States. Researchers say they see clear signs that the base is being upgraded.

Updated at 6:55 p.m. ET

The U.S. Marine Corps reports that two of its aircraft were involved in a "mishap" off the coast of Japan around 2 a.m. local time on Wednesday.

A Marine spokesman released a statement saying one of the personnel from the planes "is being evaluated by competent medical authorities." Searchers are trying to find six missing Marines.

The statement offered few details:

Police in Australia on Wednesday arrested the former husband of a woman who disappeared 36 years ago and has long been presumed dead. Renewed interest in the cold case came about after it was the subject of a hugely popular Australian podcast series called The Teacher's Pet.

According to the podcast, when Lynette Dawson disappeared in January 1982 she was 33, living in a Sydney suburb with her husband, Chris Dawson — a high school teacher and former professional rugby player — and their two children.

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All this week, we've been looking at the life and legacy of President George Herbert Walker Bush - his legacy both on domestic issues here in the U.S. and how he projected American power abroad.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

All this week, we've been looking at the life and legacy of President George Herbert Walker Bush - his legacy both on domestic issues here in the U.S. and how he projected American power abroad.

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